SPAY and NEUTER ~ WHY?

WHY SPAY AND NEUTER RABBITS?


A RABBIT’S NATURE ~

Rabbits are animals of prey and, in order to survive, they must mature sexually very quickly and breed often; hence, the mating instincts of both males and females are very strong.

Small, dwarf breeds reach adolescence at 3-4 months of age; others anywhere between 3 and 6 months of age

A rabbit can be compelled to act in ways that make him less desirable as a house companion ~ such as copious mounting, urine spraying, poor litterbox usage, aggressive behaviors, and more

Rabbits are social animals and most enjoy the companionship of another rabbit.  This is not possible with unaltered rabbits due to sexual frustration and aggression.  Even one unaltered rabbit in a pair will unfairly be overly attentive and frustrated.

He or she isn’t being intentionally contrary, just following Mother Nature’s basic urges.

The transformation after spaying or neutering will not be immediate.  It takes a few weeks for the hormone levels to drop.  Males can still impregnate unspayed females during these several weeks



ALTERED RABBITS ARE HEALTHIER AND LIVE LONGER ~ 

The risk of reproductive cancers (ovarian, uterine, mammarian) is virtually eliminated

Unspayed females run a very high risk of dying from uterine cancer by the age of three

Prevents other diseases of the reproductive tract, such as infection of the uterus (pyometra)

Neutered males won’t be tempted to fight with other animals due to sexual aggression

Neutering eliminates the risk of testicular cancer



ALTERED RABBITS MAKE BETTER COMPANIONS ~

They are calmer, more loving, and more dependable

They are less prone to destructive (chewing, digging) behavior

They are less aggressive (biting, lunging, circling, growling)

Urine spraying ceases

Litterbox usage becomes more reliable



ALTERED RABBITS CAN SAFELY HAVE A COMPANION ~

Both rabbits need to be altered to have an even ‘playing field’

Their heirarchy will still have to be established, but that can be accomplished without the excessive aggression created by raging hormones



ALTERED RABBITS WON’T CONTRIBUTE TO THE PROBLEM OF OVERPOPULATION ~

Over 15 million adorable dogs, cats, and rabbits are killed in animal shelters in the country every year

Unwanted rabbits are often abandoned in fields, parks, or on city streets to fend for themselves.  There they suffer from starvation and sickness, as well as being easy prey for other animals, and are at great risk of being hit by vehicles.

Those rabbits who are sold to pet stores don’t necessarily fare any better, as pet stores will sell to anyone with the money to buy, and they don’t check on what kind of home they will go to.  Many of these rabbits will be sold as snake food, or as a pet for a small child who will soon become bored with or “outgrow” the rabbit.



Information obtained from ~



 

Note:  Comments in italics were added by Meadow

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